Help Suburban Collection dealerships ‘Drive Away Hunger’

The Suburban Collection, with nine dealerships in Farmington Hills, has launched its second annual Drive Away Hunger campaign with Gleaners Community Food Bank to raise funds for 375,000 meals by November 30.

“Through times of uncertainty, Gleaners has always stepped in to make sure local families know where their next meals are coming from,” said David Fischer Jr., Group Vice President. “Across The Suburban Collection, our team members are enthusiastic and determined to support Gleaners’ efforts throughout our community—with a bit of friendly competition added.”

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Jon Aldred for Farmington Hills City Council

Leadership and 2,500 team members across southeast Michigan will hold location-specific fundraising initiatives ranging from casual Friday events to golf outings. You can donate online at gcfb.org/drive-away, or visit these Hills locations:

  • Audi Farmington Hills at 37911 Grand River Ave.
  • Porsche of Farmington Hills at 37911 Grand River Ave.
  • Suburban Chrysler Dodge Jeep Ram of Farmington Hills at 38123 W 10 Mile Rd.
  • Suburban Honda at 25100 Haggerty Rd.
  • Suburban Mazda of Farmington Hills at 37911 Grand River Ave.
  • Suburban Nissan of Farmington Hills at 37901 Grand River Ave.
  • Suburban Toyota of Farmington Hills at 35200 Grand River Ave.
  • Suburban Volkswagen of Farmington Hills at 37911 Grand River Ave.
  • Suburban Collision of Farmington Hills at 34600 Grand River Ave.

Every dollar donated provides three meals.

“Life has changed for everyone in the past year and a half, and so many of our neighbors in need continue to worry how they will make ends meet,” said Gleaners president and CEO Gerry Brisson. “One thing we can do together is to make sure food is not one of their worries.”

Headquartered in Detroit, Gleaners operates dozens of emergency distribution sites across Southeast Michigan, from urban neighborhoods to rural towns. Eighty percent of the households Gleaners serves through its emergency mobile response efforts include kids under 18.

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